Vol. 165 No. #25 Archives

More Stories from the June 19, 2004 issue

  1. Health & Medicine

    Hepatitis C drugs are less effective in black patients

    A standard drug combination for hepatitis C is less likely to knock out the virus in blacks than in whites.

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  2. Physics

    Squashed spheres set a record for filling space

    Modestly deformed spheres can stack with unexpected compactness.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Compound in salsa kills off Salmonella

    Cilantro, one of the key ingredients of salsa, harbors an antibacterial compound that attacks Salmonella bacteria.

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  4. Sperm defender has second role

    An antimicrobial protein may also trigger maturation of sperm.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Tackling stroke and heart risks

    Lowering cholesterol in diabetes patients lessens their risk of heart attack or stroke, even when their initial cholesterol was in the normal range.

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  6. Gene variant boosts diabetes risk

    Variant forms of two genes that encode receptor proteins for the hormone adiponectin show up more often in people with type 2 diabetes than in people who don't have the disease.

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  7. Health & Medicine

    Cell transplants stop diabetes in some patients

    Islet cell transplants can reverse diabetes in some patients.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Blocking an enzyme combats disease

    By blocking an enzyme that breaks down a beneficial compound in the body, researchers are able to help diabetes patients control their blood sugar.

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  9. Physics

    Teleporting Matter’s Traits: Beaming information quantum-style

    Physicists have transferred a quantum state from one atom to another by manipulating a mysterious, atom-to-atom quantum link called entanglement.

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  10. Planetary Science

    Portrait of Phoebe: Cassini images a large Saturn moon

    The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft took the first close-up images ever recorded of one of Saturn's oddest moons, Phoebe.

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  11. Earth

    Blueberry Hills: Utah nodules resemble some found on Mars

    Analyses of small iron oxide nodules found within certain sandstones of the U.S. Southwest could shed light on how similar spherules may have formed on Mars.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Better Form, Same Function: Liposuction doesn’t lessen health risks

    Liposuction doesn't improve the long-term health prospects of very obese people.

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  13. Animals

    A tale of new whiskers

    A newly discovered, featherweight tree mouse with an unexpected evolutionary past has survived widespread habitat destruction on the Philippine island of Luzon.

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  14. Tuning Up Young Minds: Music lessons give kids a small IQ advantage

    Regular music lessons, focused either on learning to play an instrument or to sing, result in small but statistically significant IQ gains for first graders by the end of the school year, a new study finds.

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  15. Bubble Trouble: Mad cow proteins may hitch a ride between cells

    Prions, the proteins behind mad cow disease, may travel between cells in bubbles called exosomes.

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  16. Paleontology

    Fossil Fingerprints: Rare earths tie bones to burial ground

    The soil in which fossilization occurs leaves a chemical imprint on the bones, suggesting that scientists can use this soil signature to identify more precisely a fossil's original home.

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  17. Tech

    Sixth Sense

    A budding technology called electric field imaging may soon enable devices such as appliances, toys, and computers to detect the presence of people and respond to their motions.

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  18. Health & Medicine

    Narcolepsy Science Reawakens

    Recent advances in understanding the biological underpinnings of narcolepsy have created a new diagnostic tool and point toward possible future therapies.

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  19. Humans

    Letters from the June 19, 2004, issue of Science News

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