Vol. 165 No. #21 Archives

More Stories from the May 22, 2004 issue

  1. Astronomy

    Windy endeavor

    In early April, an Earth-orbiting satellite closed its doors after more than 2 years of collecting ions from the solar wind.

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  2. Two egg cells make fatherless mouse

    By fusing two egg cells, researchers have created a mouse with no father.

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  3. Earth

    Filtered air cuts down mutations

    Microscopic particles in the air may mutate the DNA of sperm.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Herbal erection pills may be spiked

    Some pills marketed as herbal remedies for erectile dysfunction contain drugs that should be available only by prescription.

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  5. Neurons slow down for placebo effect

    A placebo treatment temporarily quelled symptoms of Parkinson's disease in six people by decreasing the electrical activity of brain cells crucial to the condition.

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  6. Astronomy

    Before the big one hits

    The next time you hear about an asteroid or comet about to hit Earth, you can go to a new Internet site to find out where the collision will be and how much damage will occur.

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  7. Archaeology

    Guatemalan sites yield Maya insights

    Excavations at three archaeological sites in Guatemala have provided new insights into both the early and late stages of ancient Maya civilization.

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  8. Paleontology

    Rare English bits are oldest known charcoal

    Analyses of small black chunks of material extracted from 420-million-year-old rocks found along the England-Wales border suggest that they're remnants of the earliest known wildfire.

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  9. Astronomy

    Old Stars Even Older: Determining a new age for the universe

    Using particles accelerators to mimic the conditions inside stars, two independent research groups have found evidence that the most-ancient known stars are about a billion years older than astronomers had estimated.

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  10. Pot on the Spot: Marijuana’s risks become blurrier

    A research review challenges the assumption that scientists have demonstrated a causal link between teenage marijuana use and later psychological and behavioral problems.

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  11. Plants

    Wind Highways: Mosses, lichens travel along aerial paths

    Invisible freeways of wind may account for the similarity of plant species on islands that lie thousands of kilometers apart.

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  12. Breeds Apart: Purebred dogs defined by DNA differences

    The most thorough DNA analysis yet of purebred dogs suggests that canine breeds can also be discerned genetically with great accuracy.

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  13. Materials Science

    Branching Out: Semiconducting nanotrees could boost electronics

    Forests of semiconducting nanotrees could form the basis of future solar cells, low-energy lighting, and other optical or microelectronic devices.

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  14. Earth

    A Portrait of Pollution: Nation’s fresh water gets a checkup

    Virtually all of America's fresh water is tainted with low concentrations of chemical contaminants, according to a new nationwide study.

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  15. Humans

    Young Talent on Display: Tomorrow’s scientists and engineers win recognition, rewards

    The three top winners of the 2004 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair hail from high schools on different continents.

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  16. Anthropology

    Humanity’s Strange Face

    New fossil finds in a Romanian cave fuel controversy over whether different, closely related species interbred on the evolutionary path that led to people.

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  17. Astronomy

    Dark Doings

    A slew of new and proposed experiments, ranging from the cosmic to the subatomic scale, may shed light on why the expansion of the universe is speeding up.

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  18. Humans

    Letters from the May 22, 2004, issue of Science News

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