Vol. 158 No. #10 Archives

More Stories from the September 2, 2000 issue

  1. Brain-Cell Loss Found in Narcolepsy

    The puzzling sleep disorder known as narcolepsy stems from the destruction of a small group of brain cells.

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  2. NIH OKs work on stem cells

    The U.S. government opened the door for U.S. scientists to receive federal funding for research on stem cells from human embryos.

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  3. Chemistry

    Additive gives improved mileage, less smog

    A new fuel additive, polyisobutylene, decreases automobile emissions by 70 percent while increasing power and mileage.

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  4. Gene find could yield decaffeinated plants

    The first published report of cloning a gene for caffeine synthesis raises the possibility of creating decaf plants.

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  5. Astronomy

    Neutron stars twist Einstein’s theory

    Astronomers may finally have found evidence of a key prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity—that a spinning object drags space-time along with it.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Carotid surgery stands test of time

    Surgery to remove blockages from the carotid artery in the neck has lasting effects against stroke over several years and even provides some benefit when it's delayed.

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  7. Strep infection sets off tics in some kids

    Some children may have a genetic susceptibility to developing obsessive-compulsive disorder and tic ailments after a streptococcal infection.

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  8. Earth

    Study gives new answer for muddy mystery

    Geologists provide evidence that quartz silt in ancient seabeds doesn't come from eroded land rocks, but rather from the dissolved skeletons of tiny primitive creatures, possibly altering the fossil record and changing models of prehistoric climate and ocean geography.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    Marrow converted into brain cells

    Scientists can now efficiently transform bone marrow into nerve cells.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Sperm just say NO to egg cells

    Sperm fertilizing an egg produce a whiff of nitric oxide.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Data faked in immune-system study

    A researcher fabricated evidence suggesting that never-before-seen RNA-DNA-hybrid molecules play a role in creating antibodies.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Coffee linked to rheumatoid arthritis

    People who drink four or more cups of coffee per day appear more likely to get rheumatoid arthritis than are those drinking less.

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  13. Health & Medicine

    Do zinc lozenges shorten common colds?

    People taking zinc to fight a cold report less coughing, less nasal discharge, and a shorter cold than do people getting a placebo.

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  14. Humans

    Cutting edge chemistry rushes online

    A new online server offers a place for communicating chemistry research to other scientists quickly and without peer review.

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  15. Humans

    Russia’s nuclear-safety issues spread

    A leading Russian environmentalist, Aleksandr Nikitin, says Russia's problems with nuclear-waste management should concern people beyond that country's borders.

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  16. Tech

    Coddled crystal slams door on light

    A better fabrication process yields such a high-quality optical material that microchips using light, rather than electrons, may be close to reality.

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  17. Tech

    Making machines from genes

    A novel machine made from DNA also uses DNA as its fuel.

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  18. Earth

    New Concerns about Phthalates

    Boys may face an eventual reproductive risk from exposure to some of the ingredients that go into many common plastics, cosmetics, and medical supplies.

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  19. Health & Medicine

    Transplanted Hopes

    Islet-cell success may bring a diabetes cure closer.

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