Fish guts reveal microbial alliance | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.


News

Fish guts reveal microbial alliance

By
8:02pm, March 21, 2004

When most people clean a fish, they throw away the guts, but a team of biologists would rather take a close look at them.

To understand the roles of the many microbes that live naturally within mammalian intestines, Jeffrey I. Gordon of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has long studied mice born and raised germfree (SN: 5/31/03, p. 344: Gut Check). Now, he and his colleagues are pursuing similar studies with zebra fish.

While these small vertebrates don't possess a stomach, much of the rest of their intestinal tract resembles the mammalian system. Equally important, zebra fish larvae are transparent, enabling the scientists to easily observe gut development.

This article is available only to subscribing members. Join the Society today or Log in.

Get Science News headlines by e-mail.

More from Science News

From the Nature Index Paid Content