Vol. 179 No. #12 Archives

More Stories from the June 4, 2011 issue

  1. Humans

    No nuts for you, Nutcracker Man

    Tooth analysis shows huge-jawed hominid grazed on grasses and sedges.

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  2. Life

    Sickle-cell may blunt, not stop, malaria

    Once thought to keep parasite out of cells, the trait appears to diminish the severity of infection.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Coronary bypass rates drop

    Heart patients have been less likely to undergo the surgery since 2001, with many getting a less invasive procedure.

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  4. Space

    Signs of dark matter from Minnesota mine

    An underground experiment in the U.S. bolsters the case that Earth plows through a halo of dark matter particles.

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  5. Life

    Giant ants once roamed Wyoming

    The first complete fossil found in North America suggests warm spells in the far north allowed big insects to spread.

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  6. Earth

    Warming dents corn and wheat yields

    Rising temperatures have decreased global grain production and may be partly responsible for food price increases.

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  7. Chemistry

    Spray of zinc marks fertilization

    Embryonic development begins with an outpouring of the metal, illustrating chemistry's importance in orchestrating biological processes.

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  8. Psychology

    Autism rates head up

    Disorders may affect more kids than previously thought, a study in South Korea suggests.

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  9. Life

    Animals quickly colonized freshwater

    Fossilized worm burrows show that life had moved beyond the oceans by 530 million years ago.

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  10. Space

    Crab Nebula activity keeps confounding

    Unusually rapid fluctuations in the output of a supernova remnant send theorists scuttling for a reasonable explanation.

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  11. Humans

    Networks dominated by rule of the few

    Certain systems, including social hubs like Facebook, can be directed from relatively few control points.

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  12. Humans

    Stone Age cold case baffles scientists

    Stone-tool makers who hunkered down near Arctic Circle left uncertain clues to their identity.

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  13. Life

    Body attacks lab-made stem cells

    In mice, the immune system targets and destroys reprogrammed adult skin cells, raising questions about their medical potential.

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  14. Earth

    Ozone hole on the mend

    Researchers claim to see atmospheric healing more than a decade earlier than a detectable uptick was expected.

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  15. Science & Society

    Youthful ingenuity honored at Intel ISEF

    Young scientists receive awards for insights applicable to cancer treatment, homeland security, water supplies and more.

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  16. Science Future for June 4, 2011

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  17. SN Online

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  18. From the Archive

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  19. Lab Coats in Hollywood: Science, Scientists, and Cinema by David A. Kirby

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  20. The Darwin Archipelago: The Naturalist’s Career Beyond Origin of Species by Steve Jones

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  21. The Theory That Would Not Die: How Bayes’ Rule Cracked the Enigma Code, Hunted Down Russian Submarines, and Emerged Triumphant from Two Centuries of Controversy by Sharon Bertsch McGrayne

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  22. Dream Life: An Experimental Memoir by J. Allan Hobson

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  23. Book Review: Is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?: The Net’s Impact on Our Minds and Future by John Brockman, ed.

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  24. Science & Society

    Blood Work

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  25. Astronomy

    Stellar oddballs

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  26. Health & Medicine

    Healthy Aging in a Pill

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  27. Humans

    Simple Heresy

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  28. Letters

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  29. Science Past from the issue of June 3, 1961

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  30. Atlas of Oceans: An Ecological Survey of Underwater Life by John Farndon

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