Vol. 179 No. #11 Archives

More Stories from the May 21, 2011 issue

  1. Space

    Dry ice, wetter Mars

    A previously unknown reservoir of frozen carbon dioxide could periodically vaporize, thickening the atmosphere and allowing liquid water to flow on the Red Planet’s surface.

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  2. Life

    Gut bacteria come in three flavors

    Everybody has one of a trio of types — and which one seems to be less important than how the bugs behave.

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  3. Chemistry

    Pesticides tied to lower IQ in children

    Chemicals once sprayed in homes — and still used on farms — were found to have significant effects in three studies.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Flies on meth burn through sugar

    Cellular effects may explain why addicts often have a sweet tooth.

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  5. Earth

    Ozone loss made tropics rainier

    Hole over Antarctica changes weather patterns all the way to the equator, simulations suggest.

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  6. Psychology

    Why some gorillas go unseen

    Attention differences help to explain why some people don't notice surprising sights.

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  7. Life

    Teamwork keeps fire ants high and dry

    Scientists get a look at the physics that floats a bug's boat.

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  8. Life

    The eyespots have it after all

    New experiments may reconcile conflicting views regarding what makes a peacock’s plumage attractive to females.

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  9. Tech

    Robot based on cartwheeling caterpillars

    GoQBot curls itself up and takes off spinning.

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  10. Life

    Great (Dane) minds don’t think alike

    Female dogs react to an unexpected twist that males show no awareness of, suggesting that canine sexes are wired differently.

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  11. Life

    Half-asleep rats look wide awake

    In a discovery with ominous implications for sleep deprivation, researchers find that some brain regions can doze off while an animal remains active.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Armadillos may spread leprosy

    A new strain of the disease has shown up in patients and in the animals in parts of the Deep South, suggesting a cause of rare U.S. cases.

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  13. Humans

    Most Neandertals were right-handers

    Right handedness, and perhaps spoken language, originated at least a half million years ago, a new study suggests.

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  14. Earth

    With warming, Arctic is losing ground

    Scientists anticipate big ecosystem changes as erosion spills nutrients into the sea

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  15. Space

    Former planet may have grown a tail

    Pluto appears to trail a cometlike cloud of gas.

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  16. Earth

    Grand Canyon born by continental lift

    A "drip" deep within the Earth may have raised the Colorado plateau to create the spectacular landscape of the U.S. Southwest.

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  17. Space

    Gravity Probe B finally pays off

    A half century in the making, an orbiting experiment finally confirms Einstein's general relativity.

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  18. Science Future for May 21, 2011

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  19. From the Archive

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  20. SN Online

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  21. Driven to Extinction: The Impact of Climate Change on Biodiversity by Richard Pearson

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  22. Quantify!: A Crash Course in Smart Thinking by Göran Grimvall

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  23. The Cloud Collector’s Handbook by Gavin Pretor-Pinney

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  24. The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James Gleick

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  25. One Hundred Names for Love: A Stroke, a Marriage, and the Language of Healing by Diane Ackerman

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  26. Let Them Eat Shrimp: The Tragic Disappearance of the Rainforests of the Sea by Kennedy Warne

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  27. Health & Medicine

    Going Under

    While every anesthetic drug has its own effect, scientists know little about how the various versions work on the brain to transport patients from normal waking awareness to dreamless nothingness.

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  28. Dawn of the Dinosaurs

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  29. Into orbit

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  30. Letters

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  31. Science Past from the issue of May 20, 1961

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  32. The Great Sperm Whale: A Natural History of the Ocean’s Most Magnificent and Mysterious Creature by Richard Ellis

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