March 17, 2018 | Science News

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March 17, 2018View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute reflects on finding common ground with science and policy.
By Nancy Shute | March 3, 2018
Magazine issue: Vol. 193, No. 5 , March 17, 2018 , p. 2

Features

mother with newborn

Feature

Scientists search new mothers’ minds for clues to postpartum depression.
peatland fire in Indonesia

Feature

Bogs and other peatlands around the world store outsized amounts of carbon. Climate change and agriculture are putting them at risk.

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Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute reflects on finding common ground with science and policy.

Features

peatland fire in Indonesia
Bogs and other peatlands around the world store outsized amounts of carbon. Climate change and agriculture are putting them at risk.
mother with newborn
Scientists search new mothers’ minds for clues to postpartum depression.

News

MRI scans of brains of healthy and stroke patients
Very young babies who have strokes in the language centers of their brain can recover normal language function — in the other side of their brain.
orangutan mom and baby
Only small numbers of Bornean orangutans will survive coming decades, researchers say.
The search is on for a rare nuclear decay that could prove neutrinos are their own antiparticles and shed light on the universe’s antimatter mystery.
cave art
Ancient humans’ close relatives also created rock art and shell ornaments, studies assert.
illustration of potential alien microbes
Americans would probably take the discovery of extraterrestrial microbes pretty well.
seal pup
Prevailing winds can send northern fur seal pups on an epic journey.
smog over LA
A study of smog in the Los Angeles valley finds that paints, fragrances and other everyday items are a growing component of the problem.
Matabele ant
Termite-hunting ants have their own version of combat medicine for injured nest mates.
Alzheimer's protein
Inhibiting an enzyme involved in the production of Alzheimer’s protein globs also made old globs, or plaques, disappear in mouse brains.
quantum computer
Scientists performed the first quantum algorithms in silicon, and probed quantum bits with light.
table sugar
In mice, fructose gets processed in the small intestine before getting to the liver.
skates
These strange walking fish might teach us about the evolutionary origins of our own ability to walk.
close-up of an eye
A newly crafted artificial eye could help researchers study treatments for dry eye disease and other ailments.
Gentoo penguin
Scientists say carbon and nitrogen isotopes found in penguin tissues can indicate shifts in the Antarctic environment.
rabbit
A popular tale about rabbit domestication turns out to be fiction.

Notebook

Thelazia gulosa
Oregon woman has the first ever eye infection with the cattle eyeworm Thelazia gulosa.
Enterprise nebulae
Astronomy artists face new challenges in translating James Webb’s invisible data into visuals.
pulsar illustration
Thousands of pulsars have been discovered since the announcement of their detection 50 years ago.
algal bloom
Human activities are driving phosphorus levels in the world’s lakes and other freshwater bodies to a critical point.

Reviews & Previews

hydrothermal fields in Ethiopia
Hosted by Will Smith, ‘One Strange Rock’ embraces Earth’s weirdness and explores the planet’s natural history.
brain
The Biological Mind rejects the idea of the brain as the lone organ that makes us who we are. Our body and environment also factor in, Alan Jasanoff says.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about the physical trace of memory, magnetic monopoles, blowflies and more.

Science Visualized

fishing map
Industrial fishing now occurs across 55 percent of the world’s ocean area while only 34 percent of Earth’s land area is used for agriculture or grazing.