Vol. 175 No. #7

More Stories from the March 28, 2009 issue

  1. Life

    Prions complicit in Alzheimer’s disease

    A study in mice suggests a version of prion proteins, which are known to cause the brain-wasting mad cow and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, may also play a role in neuron malfunction.

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  2. Anthropology

    Modern feet step back 1.5 million years

    Researchers say that 1.5-million-year-old footprints discovered in eastern Africa show that a human ancestor had modern-looking feet and walked much like people do today.

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  3. Humans

    Playing for real in a virtual world

    Preteen boys and girls interacting in a virtual world display the same contrasting play styles that have been observed in real-world settings.

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  4. Physics

    Black hole constant makes unexpected appearance

    A mathematical constant that emerges only in the unusual conditions of specific black hole systems has shown up in a simple Newtonian system.

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  5. Life

    Gene links autism, bellyaches

    Researchers have uncovered a genetic link between autism and gastrointestinal disorders in some families.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Popular acid blockers, anticlotting drug don’t mix

    Acid-blocking drugs commonly prescribed to cardiac patients upon hospital discharge seem to interfere with an anticlotting drug.

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  7. Paleontology

    Dinosaur handprints reveal birdlike arm anatomy

    Inward-facing palms evolved much earlier than previously recognized, a new study finds.

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  8. Ecosystems

    Fish shrinkage reversible, but better hurry

    In an experiment, scientists show that, although it takes generations, fish can rebound from evolutionary pressures created by selective harvesting, which has pushed some populations to become small and slow-growing.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    New drug shows benefits against nasty asthma

    An experimental drug called mepolizumab prevents some emergency asthma attacks in people who no longer benefit from normal doses of steroids.

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  10. Archaeology

    Horse domestication traced to ancient central Asian culture

    New lines of evidence indicate that horses were domesticated for riding and milking more than 5,000 years ago by members of a hunter-gatherer culture in northern Kazakhstan.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Chemotherapy drug may in fact strengthen some cancer cells

    Research shows a standard drug for treating brain cancer can actually make some cells more aggressive.

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  12. Physics

    When the ink hits the page

    Scientists investigate the physics of the most printable ink and find the most viscous inks don’t make the grade.

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  13. Humans

    Science’s next generation wins accolades

    Star students receive more than $530,000 in scholarships and prizes in the Intel Science Talent Search.

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  14. Health & Medicine

    Scientists find a soup of suspects while probing milk’s link to cancer

    Latest studies focus on estrogens, androgens and IGF-1.

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  15. Science Future for March 28, 2009

    Science Future April 6 Lawrence Krauss and other Scientists give public lectures as part of Arizona State University’s Origins Symposium in Tempe. Visit origins.asu.edu April 11 Food for Thought, an interdisciplinary conference on global food and agriculture issues, held at Stanford University. Visit foodforthought.stanford.edu April 12–18 National Environmental Education Week. See www.eeweek.org

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  16. The Age of Anxiety: A History of America’s Turbulent Affair with Tranquilizers by Andrea Tone

    The story of America’s shift to synthetic solutions for personal angst. Basic Books, 2009, 298 p., $26.95

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  17. The Quantum Frontier: The Large Hadron Collider by Don Lincoln

    A Fermilab scientist conveys the excitement surrounding the LHC. Johns Hopkins Univ., 2009, 172 p., $25 The Quantum Frontier: The Large Hadron Collider by Don Lincoln

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  18. A Primer for Mathematics Competitions by Alexander Zawaira and Gavin Hitchcock

    A guide to acquiring the mental equipment and problem-solving agility needed to become a successful mathlete. Oxford Univ., 2009, 344 p., $45. A Primer for Mathematics Competitions by Alexander Zawaira and Gavin Hitchcock

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  19. Haywired: Pointless (Yet Awesome) Projects for the Electronically Inclined by Mike Rigsby

    Make a smiling picture frame, a talking alarm, a no-battery electric car and more with this how-to guide for hobbyists. Chicago Review, 2009, 187 p., $16.95 Haywired: Pointless (Yet Awesome) Projects for the Electronically Inclined by Mike Rigsby

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  20. Book Review: Not One Drop: Betrayal and Courage in the Wake of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill by Riki Ott

    Just as Katrina was more than a hurricane, the Exxon Valdez disaster was more than an oil spill, writes marine biologist and “fisherma’am” Riki Ott. In this account, Ott traces the forces that led up to what she calls “The Big One,” and chronicles the tragic environmental, personal and legal fallout from the spill. Just […]

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  21. Treaty on antiquities hinders access for museums

    Treaty on antiquities hinders access for museums JAMES CUNO Like water on a leaky roof, looted artifacts are finding the path of least resistance to a buyer somewhere. Art Inst. of Chicago James Cuno, a past president of the Association of Art Museum Directors, has spent years investigating implications of a United Nations treaty: the […]

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  22. Life

    Live Wires

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  23. Networks of Plunder

    Every day for months, Morag Kersel walked through the streets of Jerusalem to interview researchers, antiquities dealers, museum officials and others about the trafficking of ancient goods: pottery, sawed-off pieces of statues, decorated blocks sliced off the tops of ancient door frames, and biblical coins, to name a few. NETWORKS OF PLUNDER | Clockwise from […]

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  24. Materials Science

    Cornering the Terahertz Gap

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  25. Letters

    Impossible view In “Milky Way puts on weight” (SN: 1/31/09, p. 8), you claim to show an image of the Milky Way. This image cannot be real. Worse, it creates misconceptions: As a college educator, I find that most students actually believe NASA has launched probes outside of the Milky Way to take pictures of […]

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  26. Science Past for March 28, 1959

    [Patients] to run own wing in hospital — A new wing which is being added to an English mental hospital will be run entirely by the patients. Doctors and nurses will enter it only by invitation. Administration will be by a committee of patients, which will have a room for meetings…. Patients will themselves decide […]

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  27. Everyday Practice of Science: Where Intuition and Passion Meet Objectivity and Logic by Frederick Grinnell

    A scientist attempts to demystify the scientific method. Oxford Univ., 2009, 230 p., $27.95 Everyday Practice of Science: Where Intuition and Passion Meet Objectivity and Logic by Frederick Grinnell

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