Vol. 175 No. #10 Archives

More Stories from the May 9, 2009 issue

  1. Earth

    Arctic ice more vulnerable than ever

    Ocean’s ice cap is smaller than long-term average and thinnest yet as melt season begins.

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  2. Earth

    Nickel down, oxygen up

    Researchers point to the early ocean's concentration of nickel as the possible start for events that allowed Earth's atmosphere to accumulate oxygen.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Acid reflux link to asthma now in doubt

    Heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors, commonly prescribed for asthma patients, don’t prevent breathing attacks.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    The other, friendly fat

    Brown fat is active in adult humans and could help keep people lean.

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  5. Materials Science

    Double-laser approach makes one thin line

    Erasing and stenciling could refine tiny printing for sculpting nano-sized devices.

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  6. Animals

    Oh, he’s such a lab bird

    Bold flycatchers may be more likely than shy birds to get trapped for lab studies.

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  7. Life

    Early land arthropods sported shells

    Ancient ocean-dwelling arthropods may have worn shells to enable their transition to land.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Hypoglycemia linked to dementia

    Episodes of low blood sugar that require medical attention seem to increase a person’s risk of developing dementia in old age, a study in people with type 2 diabetes shows.

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  9. Space

    Massive solar flares captured in 3-D

    Distance between orbiting STEREO craft allows better imaging of coronal mass ejections.

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  10. Life

    Lizards sunbathe for another reason

    Panther chameleons may regulate their vitamin D levels by lounging in the sun.

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  11. Tech

    Cloaked eye still sees

    Researchers have proposed a model that would allow sensors to send and receive information virtually undetected.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Seemingly misplaced DNA acts as lenses

    Nocturnal animals orient DNA in retinal cells to focus light.

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  13. Physics

    Nanoclusters seem to skirt physics law

    In simulations, tiny loophole allows colliding nanoclusters to increase speed after impact.

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  14. Plants

    Landscaper’s darling hybridizes into an environmental nuisance

    Variation underlies the Callery pear tree’s transformation .

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  15. Science Future for May 9, 2009

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  16. The Fifth Postulate: How Unraveling a Two-Thousand-Year-Old Mystery Unraveled the Universe by Jason Socrates Bardi

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  17. Book Review: Darwin’s Sacred Cause: How a Hatred of Slavery Shaped Darwin’s Views on Human Evolution by Adrian Desmond and James Moore

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  18. Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunamis: Projects and Principles for Beginning Geologists by Matthys Levy and Mario Salvadori

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  19. At Nobel Conference, scientists and public converse

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  20. Animals

    Swarm Savvy

    How bees, ants and other animals avoid dumb collective decisions

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  21. The Genetic Dimension of Height and Health

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  22. Ecosystems

    Living Physics

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  23. Letters

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  24. Science Past from the issue of May 9, 1959

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  25. Nanoscale: Visualizing an Invisible World by Kenneth S. Deffeyes and Stephen E. Deffeyes

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