Vol. 158 No. #21 Archives

More Stories from the November 18, 2000 issue

  1. Chemistry

    Chemistry Catches Cocaine at Source

    Scientists have devised a method for identifying cocaine's geographical origin by determining the chemical signatures of five distinct coca-growing regions in the Andes.

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  2. Earth

    New database describes all the marbles

    Analyses of the isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in hundreds of samples of Greek marble may help researchers identify the quarries that supplied the stone for some of Europe's most famous statues and architecture.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Gene therapy might keep arteries open

    Tiny steel-mesh tubes coated with a DNA-containing polymer could prevent arteries from becoming reclogged after cardiovascular treatment.

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  4. Untreated schizophrenia may spare brain

    Contrary to the fears of some researchers, treatment delays for schizophrenia may not worsen brain deficits associated with the mental disorder.

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  5. Wild tobacco heeds ‘ouch’ from sagebrush

    Biologists studying wild tobacco and sagebrush say they have found a case of interspecies plant communication in the field.

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  6. Astronomy

    Variable quasar may help measure the cosmos

    A flickering cosmic mirage, recorded for the first time in X rays, promises to provide a new estimate of how rapidly the universe is expanding.

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  7. Health & Medicine

    Path to heart health is one with a peel

    Consuming lots of oranges and other citrus fruits, or their juices, can trigger beneficial, cholesterol-moderating changes in the blood.

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  8. Tech

    Chair becomes personalized posture coach

    Pressure imprints made by a person in a chair provide a new type of computer input useful for tracking posture or, perhaps, other clues to someone's activities and state of mind.

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  9. Planetary Science

    When storms collide on Jupiter

    Astronomers have for the first time witnessed two giant storms merging on Jupiter.

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  10. Planetary Science

    NASA postpones plans for Mars samples

    Still reeling from the failure of its two most recent missions to Mars, NASA announced late last month that it would delay by nearly a decade plans to bring back samples from the Red Planet.

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  11. Study casts doubt on minibacteria

    Results from polymerase chain reaction experiments challenge the existence of ultratiny microbes called nanobacteria.

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  12. Drug-resistance gene found—again

    A mutant gene confers resistance to chloroquine upon parasites that cause malaria.

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  13. Earth

    Sprawl’s aquatic pollution

    A new study links the traffic associated with urban sprawl to an unexpectedly large rain of air pollutants entering local waters.

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  14. Ecosystems

    More on California’s rogue seaweed

    Scientists have obtained genetic confirmation of the assumption that a newfound rogue alga in California waters is the same strain that has been smothering seafloor communities in the Mediterranean.

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  15. Tech

    Little Big Wire

    High-temperature superconductivity makes a bid for the power grid.

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  16. Humans

    Of Rats, Mice, and Birds

    Fireworks erupt over an extension of rules to protect lab animals.

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