Vol. 162 No. #13 Archives

More Stories from the September 28, 2002 issue

  1. Health & Medicine

    New twist on a pet theory

    Growing up with cats may reduce a child's risk of developing asthma—unless the child's mother has asthma as well.

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  2. Earth

    Much that glitters is really old

    New isotopic analyses of rock samples from one of the world's richest gold-mining regions suggest that the flecks of gold in those ores are more than 3 billion years old.

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  3. Astronomy

    Found: Gamma-ray background information

    Resolving a 30-year-old mystery, astronomers say they have identified the source of the faint, high-energy glow of radiation known as the gamma-ray background.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Immune gene linked to prostate cancer

    An immune-cell gene plays a role in predisposing men to prostate cancer.

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  5. Astronomy

    Big Bang Confirmed: Seeing twists and turns of primordial light

    The latest observations of the cosmic microwave background reveal that photons from adjacent patches of the sky have slightly different polarizations.

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  6. Psychotic Biology: Genes yield clues to schizophrenia’s roots

    Two genes involved in the transmission of glutamate, a key chemical messenger in the brain, are linked to the occurrence of the severe mental disorder schizophrenia.

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  7. Health & Medicine

    New Drugs Beat Old Flu: Antiviral agents counter deadly 1918 influenza

    After partially recreating a deadly influenza virus that swept the globe from 1918 to 1919 and killed millions of people, researchers have shown that available flu drugs could probably prevent a new pandemic of the 1918 influenza strain or a similar flu.

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  8. Materials Science

    Bigger, Cheaper, Safer Batteries: New material charges up lithium-ion battery work

    A new material could make rechargeable lithium-ion batteries smaller, cheaper, and safer.

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  9. Plants

    Underground Hijinks: Thieving plants hack into biggest fungal network

    For the first time, plants have been caught tapping into the most widespread of soil fungi networks and using it to steal food from green plants.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Another Polio? Alarming West Nile fever risks emerge

    Medical workers have found poliolike symptoms in a few victims of West Nile fever, and federal officials noted that blood transfusions appear to have infected some people.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Sideways Glance: Training helps people circumvent failing sight

    Researchers have developed a rehabilitation regime that may enable many elderly people with age-related macular degeneration to improve their vision.

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  12. Tech

    Liquid Logic: Tiny plumbing networks concoct and compute

    By incorporating thousands of simple valves into microscopic networks of rubbery pipes and chambers, scientists have created fluid-manipulating microchips of unprecedented power.

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  13. Health & Medicine

    Surgery beats splints for wrist syndrome

    Surgery proves better than nighttime splints for relieving the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome.

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  14. Health & Medicine

    Are varsity athletes prone to ALS?

    A survey of patients treated for neurological problems reveals that those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) are more likely to have been varsity athletes and remained slim all their lives.

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  15. Materials Science

    Materials with Memory

    Metal alloys and polymers that can remember a preprogrammed shape may literally reshape technologies ranging from warfare to medicine and car repair.

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  16. Get Rid of the Bodies

    Scientists are learning how organisms safely clear out cell corpses.

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