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Basic tool for making organic molecules wins chemistry Nobel

Three researchers get prize for methods used to make drugs, electronics, plastics

The 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to one American- and two Japanese-born scientists for devising means for spurring extraordinarily useful and efficient reactions that coax carbon-containing molecules to bond with each other. The reactions are some of the most widely used in chemistry, yielding plastics, better light-emitting diodes for computer screens, and numerous medications, including drugs for fighting cancer, asthma and HIV.

Three scientists will share the prize: Richard Heck, who retired in 1989 from the University of Delaware in Newark, Ei-ichi Negishi of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., and Akira Suzuki, of Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan.

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