May 13, 2017 | Science News

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May 13, 2017View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the intersection of science and activism.
By Elizabeth Quill | May 5, 2017
Magazine issue: Vol. 191 No. 9 , May 13, 2017 , p. 2

Call to Action

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the intersection of science and activism.

Features

Lake Huron
Lakes worldwide are warming with consequences for every part of the food web, from algae, to walleye, to freshwater seals.
illustration of man with umbrella under raining statins
Even after decades of study, questions remain about statin safety.

News

Nitrogen bubbles may be the source of the “magic island” on Saturn’s moon Titan.
Penguin poop dumps data on how a Gentoo colony responded to ancient volcanic eruptions.
asteroid hitting Earth
Most deaths caused by an asteroid impact would result from shock waves and winds generated from the blast, rather than effects such as earthquakes and tsunamis, new simulations show.
LHCb experiment
A set of particle decay measurements could be evidence for new physics.
March hydroxyl distribution
The recent rise in atmospheric methane concentrations may have been caused by changes in atmospheric chemistry, not increased emissions from human activities, two new studies suggest.
mouse hippocampus
Plasma from human umbilical cord blood refreshes aspects of learning and memory in mice.
neutrino
An antineutrino anomaly seems due to problems with scientists’ predictions, not sterile neutrinos.
Clovis points
Ancient Americans invented a way to make spear points last on an unfamiliar continent.
pregnant woman
Taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not increase the risk of autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, two new large studies suggest.
side of fries and oils
Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke.
Pakistan map
People naturally lacking certain genes give clues about drug safety and efficacy, a study in Pakistanis shows.
Jupiter's cold spot
A previously unidentified dark mark on Jupiter has been dubbed the “Great Cold Spot” because of its temperature and resemblance to the planet’s Great Red Spot.
ancient tooth decay
Late Stone Age hunter-gatherers scraped and coated away tooth decay.
Ocean currents dump plastic garbage from the North Atlantic into previously pristine Arctic waters, new research shows.
Urumin, a protein found in Indian frog mucus secretions, has a knack for taking down H1 flu viruses, a new study finds.
water from air prototype converter
A prototype device harvests moisture from dry air and separates it into drinkable water using only sunlight.
Enceladus’ plume
The underground ocean of Saturn’s moon Enceladus harbors an abundance of molecular hydrogen, which could be an important source of food if microbial life exists there.

Notebook

Melting sea ice in Barrow, Alaska
Windmill-powered pumps on buoys throughout the Arctic Ocean could help bring back shrinking sea ice, researchers say.
a backwards asteroid orbit
Asteroid shares Jupiter’s orbit around the sun but travels in the opposite direction as the planet.
worm-snail
New worm-snail species shoots snot to snag a snack.
Aedes aegypti larvae
Researchers boldly predicted mosquitoes’ demise 50 years ago. They never came close.
a gravel devil
Large whirlwinds in northern Chile can carry gravel-sized gypsum crystals several kilometers before dumping them in mounds.

Reviews & Previews

wild silver fox
How to Tame a Fox recounts a nearly 60-year experiment in Russia to domesticate silver foxes.
Solar Eclipse in 2012
Three new books chronicle the science, history and cultural significance of total solar eclipses.

Letters to the Editor

Tricky cancer cells, brain-shaping smartphones, a cow-burying badger and more in reader feedback.

Science Visualized

ocellated lizard
The mazelike patterns of the ocellated lizard’s skin follow a set of rules from computer science.