Bones make hormones that communicate with the brain and other organs | Science News

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Bones make hormones that communicate with the brain and other organs

Mouse studies reveal bone-body connection in appetite, metabolism and more

By
3:00pm, June 21, 2017
mouse skeleton x-ray

BONE UP  The skeleton doesn’t just protect important bodily organs, it also talks to them, studies in mice show.

Long typecast as the strong silent type, bones are speaking up.

In addition to providing structural support, the skeleton is a versatile conversationalist. Bones make hormones that chat with other organs and tissues, including the brain, kidneys and pancreas, experiments in mice have shown.

“The bone, which was considered a dead organ, has really become a gland almost,” says Beate Lanske, a bone and mineral researcher at Harvard School of Dental Medicine. “There’s so much going on between bone and brain and all the other organs, it has become one of the most prominent tissues being studied at the moment.”

At least four bone hormones moonlight as couriers, recent studies show, and there could be more. Scientists have only just begun to decipher what this messaging means for health. But cataloging and investigating the hormones should offer a more nuanced understanding of how the body regulates sugar, energy and fat, among other things.

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