Julie Rehmeyer

All Stories by Julie Rehmeyer

  1. Math

    A frustrating view of complexity

    In the 1980s, an inkling emerged among some scientists that very disparate phenomena might on some deep level be related. The weather, protein folding, computers, evolution, the stock market, the immune system … each shows complex behavior arising from fairly simple interactions among its parts. BUTTERFLY EFFECT The Lorenz attractor, an icon of chaos theory. […]

  2. Math

    Counting how votes count

    A rational person will vote, economists show, as an act of altruism.

  3. Math

    Rating the rankings

    The U.S. News & World Report rankings of colleges and universities are largely arbitrary, according to a new mathematical analysis.

  4. Largest known prime number found

    Featured Math Trek column: The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search, a cooperative computing project, helps find a prime that has nearly 13 million digits.

  5. Math

    Following the ocean swirls

    The mathematics of dynamical systems reveals ocean dynamics, an understanding that could improve the monitoring of ocean processes.

  6. Math

    Largest known prime number found

    The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search, a cooperative computing project, helps find a prime that has nearly 13 million digits.

  7. Math

    A knot of light

    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Imagine twisting a beam of light into a knot, as if it were a piece of a string. Now grab another light beam and tie it around the first, forming its own loop. Tie on another and another, until all of space is […]

  8. Math

    Founder of the Secret Society of Mathematicians

    Henri Cartan, one of the leaders of a revolution in mathematics, dies at 104.

  9. Math

    Seeing in four dimensions

    Mathematicians create videos that help in visualizing four-dimensional objects.

  10. Math

    Do subatomic particles have free will?

    Math Trek: If we have free will, so do subatomic particles, mathematicians claim to prove.

  11. Math

    A Quasi-quasicrystal

    Quasicrystals are bizarre, rare, mysterious materials blending mathematical order and irregularity. A new, unexpected material halfway between a regular crystal and a quasicrystal may help reveal their secrets.

  12. Math

    A building of bubbles

    Math Trek: The National Aquatics Center in Beijing, newly built for the Olympics, is a glowing cube of bubbles. The mathematics behind it are built around Lord Kelvin's tetrakaidecahedra and the physics of foam.