Vol. 165 No. #8

More Stories from the February 21, 2004 issue

  1. Neural Aging Walks Tall: Aerobic activity fuels elderly brains, minds

    Moderate amounts of regular walking improve brain function and attention in formerly sedentary seniors.

    By
  2. Ecosystems

    Bird Dilemma: More seabirds killed when boats discard fewer fish

    A long-term study of great skuas shows that when fishing fleets discard less fish, birds that scavenge for waste make up for the loss by increasing attacks on other seabirds.

    By
  3. Earth

    Catching Waves: Ocean-surface changes may mark tsunamis

    A new theoretical model that describes a tsunami's interaction with winds may explain enigmatic observations associated with the waves and could lead to a technique for spotting them long before they hit shore.

    By
  4. Earth

    Nanosponges: Plastic particles pick up pollutants

    Nanometer-scale polymer particles can extract pollutants from contaminated soil.

    By
  5. Monkey Love: Male marmosets think highly of sex

    A new brain-imaging study in marmosets suggests that males sexually aroused by the scent of females may be thinking carefully before they mate, opposing the notion that nonhuman male mammals act purely upon a primal urge.

    By
  6. Health & Medicine

    Drug Racing: Gene tied to HIV-drug response

    A genetic mutation more common in blacks than in whites increases the odds that people taking a common HIV medicine will suffer side effects that lead them to halt treatment.

    By
  7. Health & Medicine

    Pill Puzzle: Do antibiotics increase breast cancer risk?

    A new study links antibiotic use to breast cancer, although it's not clear the drugs cause the disease.

    By
  8. Tech

    The rat in the hat

    A compact positron-emission tomography (PET) brain scanner may make possible studies of awake rats that link brain functions and behaviors.

    By
  9. Planetary Science

    A view of Mars, European style

    Although the Mars lander Beagle 2 is presumed dead, its mother craft, the European Space Agency's Mars Express, has transmitted its first data from a polar orbit about the Red Planet.

    By
  10. Health & Medicine

    Some T cells may be a fetus’ best friend

    While pregnant, mice overproduce a kind of T cell that reins in other immune cells that might target the fetus.

    By
  11. Physics

    New supergas debuts

    A cloud of ultracold potassium atoms, manipulated by means of a magnetic field, has coalesced into a new super form of matter called a fermionic condensate.

    By
  12. Health & Medicine

    Putting the brakes on toxic shock

    Scientists have discovered the cascade of molecular events that underpins many cases of toxic shock syndrome.

    By
  13. Physics

    Nuclear pudding—to go

    Moving at nearly the speed of light, atomic nuclei hurtling through a huge particle collider may become mostly dense, flattened puddings of nuclear particles known as gluons.

    By
  14. Chemistry

    Radical molecule could produce plastic magnets

    A team of chemists has synthesized an unusual organic molecule that could lead to cheaper and lighter magnets.

    By
  15. Astronomy

    Finding the star that was

    Sifting through archival images, astronomers have identified the star whose explosive demise was recorded by telescopes last year.

    By
  16. Astronomy

    Bare-Naked Galaxies

    A decade's worth of observations is spotlighting how the vast sea of gas surrounding a cluster of galaxies can alter the shape of a galaxy plowing through it.

    By
  17. Math

    Computation’s New Leaf

    Plants in which large numbers of simple units interact with one another appear to compute how to coordinate the actions of their cells effectively.

    By
  18. Humans

    Letters from the Feb. 21, 2004, issue of Science News

    Thin skin I find the language of “Thin Skin” (SN: 1/3/04, p.11: Thin Skin) to be judgmental and unscientific. For example, “desert pavement and their biota are wounded by human activity” is neither artistic nor scientific. Such narrow, biased views of ecology have no place in a scientific journal. Boone MoraGarden Valley, Calif. Out with […]

    By