Vol. 187 No. 2 Archives

Reviews & Previews

Science Visualized

Notebook

Features

More Stories from the January 24, 2015 issue

  1. head in hands
    Health & Medicine

    Hallucinated voices’ attitudes vary with culture

    Culture puts good or bad spin on voices heard by people with schizophrenia.

    By
  2. Health & Medicine

    Gene variant linked to robust flu vaccine response

    Targeting an immune signaling protein called interleukin-28B might boost protection generated by flu shots.

    By
  3. graph on decline
    Ecosystems

    Bee losses followed World Wars

    British historical records show a century-long decline of important pollinators: bees and some wasps.

    By
  4. Health & Medicine

    Old product might help smokers quit

    A drug used in Eastern Europe for decades by people trying to quit smoking outperformed a nicotine patch in a six-month test.

    By
  5. giant boulder
    Climate

    Super typhoon shoved supersized boulder

    Typhoon Haiyan pushed a 180-ton boulder, the most massive rock ever seen moved by a storm.

    By
  6. Chemistry

    Nylon goes green

    A new simple chemical reaction makes manufacturing nylon less harmful to the planet.

    By
  7. Hooded crows
    Animals

    Crows may be able to make analogies

    Crows with little training pass a lab test for analogical reasoning that requires matching similar or different icons.

    By
  8. two cobalt-blue glass beads
    Archaeology

    Ancient Egyptian blue glass beads reached Scandinavia

    Chemical analysis of Danish discoveries extends northern reach of Bronze Age trade.

    By
  9. Ruddy shelducks
    Life

    Bird flu follows avian flyways

    A deadly bird flu virus spreads along wildfowl migration routes in Asia.

    By
  10. tiny rock ant
    Animals

    Rock ants favor left turns in unfamiliar crevices

    Rock ants’ bias for turning left in mazes, a bit like handedness in people, may reflect different specializations in the halves of their nervous system.

    By
  11. Life

    Hydrogen sulfide offers clue to how reducing calories lengthens lives

    Cutting calories boosts hydrogen sulfide production, which leads to more resilient cells and longer lives, a new study suggests.

    By
  12. Europa geyser illustration
    Astronomy

    Europa’s geysers play hard-to-see

    Follow-up observations of Europa failed to confirm the existence of geysers venting the Jupiter moon’s hidden ocean into space.

    By
  13. Influenza particles
    Health & Medicine

    Priming the elderly for flu shots

    A drug that shuts down a potent signaling molecule in cells might boost protection elicited with flu vaccination, a study finds.

    By
  14. Mouse embryo
    Life

    Contamination blamed in STAP stem cell debacle

    Stem cells supposedly made in acid baths were really embryonic stem cells, investigation finds.

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  15. strands of fish eggs
    Environment

    Trash researcher tallies ocean pollution

    Marcus Eriksen has always had a thing for trash, and now he tallies ocean pollution.

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  16. A hollow tree
    Life

    Insect-eating bats implicated as Ebola outbreak source

    Insect-eating bats, not fruit bats, may have started the Ebola epidemic.

    By
  17. Humans

    Babbling to babies is OK, despite previous warnings against it

    Fifty years ago, a researcher advised banning baby talk, but results since then say otherwise.

    By