Vol. 184 No. #2 Archives

More Stories from the July 27, 2013 issue

  1. Archaeology

    Ancient Siberians may have rarely hunted mammoths

    Occasional kills by Stone Age humans could not have driven creatures to extinction, researchers say.

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  2. Astronomy

    Hubble finds hints of a planet oddly far-flung from its star

    If confirmed, the dark gap in space debris will challenge astronomers' theories.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Ebola thwarted in mice by drugs for infertility, cancer

    Extensive search of existing medicines turns up two that seem to fend off deadly virus.

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  4. Life

    Cabbage circadian clocks tick even after picking

    Daily cycles in vegetables help ward off hungry caterpillars.

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  5. Particle Physics

    First four-quark particle may have been spotted

    If confirmed, the tetraquark could shed light on how atomic nuclei are held together.

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  6. Earth

    Cleaner air may have brought more storms

    Pollution during the 20th century appears to have suppressed North Atlantic hurricanes.

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  7. Astronomy

    Cradled galaxies betray violent past

    Hubble snaps ‘the Penguin’ and its egg-shaped companion.

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  8. Animals

    Elephant diets changed millions of years before their teeth

    The animals fed on grasses long before their molars could grind the tough plants.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    A wobble of the noggin reveals the workings of the heart

    Pulse can be measured by examining a video of subtle head motions.

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  10. Animals

    Lemurs’ group size predicts social intelligence

    Primates that live with many others know not to steal food when someone is watching.

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  11. Life

    Ancient horse’s DNA fills in picture of equine evolution

    An entire genome compiled from a 700,000-year-old bone yields new information about equine history.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    No link found between vaccines and nerve-damaging condition

    Recently immunized people are not at an increased risk of developing Guillain-Barre syndrome, a nerve-damaging condition.

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  13. Life

    Genes in wheat relatives help stave off stem rust

    Wild and obscure species provide resistance to deadly fungus.

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  14. Tech

    Twisted light transmits more data

    Spiral beams allow multiple information streams in one cable.

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  15. Earth

    Faults can reseal months after quakes

    Measurements in southern China find quick healing of fractured rock.

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  16. Archaeology

    Pre-Inca empire tomb found untouched in Peru

    Gold jewelry, bronze axes and dozens of bodies were among the contents of the Wari empire ceremonial room.

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  17. Physics

    Particles defy gravity, float upstream

    Inspired by tea leaves’ reverse route into a kettle, physicists demonstrate that water’s surface tension allows unexpected movement.

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  18. Health & Medicine

    People may have evolved to fight cholera

    People in Bangladesh have genetic variations that might defend against the disease.

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  19. Space

    Distant radio-wave pulses spotted

    Signals could help astronomers understand universe's mass

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  20. Neuroscience

    Finding the brain’s common language

    Erich Jarvis dreams of creating a talking chimpanzee. If his theories on language are right, that just might happen one day.

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  21. Health & Medicine

    Permanent Present Tense

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  22. Earth

    Taking Antarctica’s temperature

    Frozen continent may not be immune to global warming.

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  23. Neuroscience

    Memories lost and found

    Drugs that help mice remember reveal role for epigenetics in recall.

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  24. Letters to the editor

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  25. Genetics

    Chromosome Variations

    Excerpt from the July 27, 1963, issue of Science News Letter

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  26. Physics

    A Piece of the Sun

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