Vol. 178 No. #10 Archives

More Stories from the November 6, 2010 issue

  1. Health & Medicine

    Getting to the bottom of diabetes and kidney disease

    Renal cells called podocytes may need insulin to maintain tissues’ blood-filtration role, a study in mice finds.

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  2. Space

    It’s only a seltzer moon

    Plumes spewing from the south pole of Saturn’s Enceladus may have carbonated source, a new analysis suggests.

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  3. Life

    Bacteria strut their stuff

    Videos show that microbes can walk on hairlike appendages.

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  4. Earth

    Oceanographers with flippers

    Tracking seal dives off Antarctica reveals seafloor troughs that affect ocean circulation.

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  5. Physics

    Tale of the tape

    The humble desk adhesive is a tiny particle accelerator.

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  6. Space

    Life may have started sky high

    Simulations of the atmosphere on Saturn’s moon Titan suggest that basic chemical ingredients could have formed far above early Earth.

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  7. Life

    One small step for a snail, one giant leap for snailkind

    Experiments suggest that gastropods shed their shells in one fell swoop during the evolutionary transition that created slugs.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    How being deaf can enhance sight

    Hearing-specialized brain regions can adapt to processing visual input, cat experiments show.

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  9. Chemistry

    Bacteria go electric

    Microbes that wire themselves up could turn waste into power.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Mice robbed of darkness fatten up

    Time of day can affect calories' impact, a study shows.

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  11. Life

    Pterosaurs might have soared 10,000 miles nonstop

    Flight analysis suggests ancient reptiles were record setters.

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  12. Planetary Science

    A comet’s tail

    Already under observation by astronomers, Hartley 2 will be visible in dark skies when it passes Earth on October 20.

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  13. Health & Medicine

    Implants help heroin addicts kick habit

    Installing a slow-release drug under the skin enables some abusers of illicit and prescription drugs to get through withdrawal, a new study shows.

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  14. Life

    More than a chicken, fewer than a grape

    A decade after the completion of the Human Genome Project, the exact number of human genes remains elusive.

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  15. Psychology

    Getting to not know you

    Knowledge of a romantic partner’s likes and dislikes declines over decades, a study finds.

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  16. Space

    Existence of habitable exoplanet questioned

    A Swiss team has failed to confirm what has recently been claimed to be the first planet outside the solar system that might be right for life.

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  17. Humans

    How testing improves memory

    By creating associations, quizzes improve recall much more effectively than just reviewing notes.

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  18. Earth

    ‘Fossil’ mountains entombed by ice

    Cold temperatures have kept a buried Antarctic range fresh for hundreds of millions of years.

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  19. Science Future

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  20. The Dog Who Couldn’t Stop Loving by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson

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  21. The Music Instinct by Philip Ball

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  22. The Man Who Invented the Computer by Jane Smiley

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  23. Portraits of the Mind by Carl Schoonover

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  24. Book Review: Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals About Our Everyday Deceptions by Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde, with Sandra Blakeslee

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  25. Book Review: Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives by Annie Murphy Paul

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  26. Top statistician explains what all those numbers mean

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  27. Iron in the Mix

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  28. Massacre at Sacred Ridge

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  29. Smoke from a Distant Fire

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  30. Letters

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  31. Science Past from the issue of November 5, 1960

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  32. Octopus by Jennifer A. Mather, Roland C. Anderson and James B. Wood

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