September 16, 2017 | Science News

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September 16, 2017View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill talks about the science of learning and how our brains process new knowledge.
By Elizabeth Quill | September 9, 2017
Magazine issue: Vol. 192 No. 4 , September 16, 2017 , p. 2

Features

machine learning illustration

Feature

Machine-learning programs are introducing biases that may harm job seekers, loan applicants and more.
illustration of brain flexibility

Feature

Brains that learn best seem able to reconfigure themselves on the fly, a new line of research suggests.
illustration of classroom brain chairs

Feature

Cognitive researchers are finding ways to help young students to hold on to all the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in school.

Call to Action

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill talks about the science of learning and how our brains process new knowledge.

Features

illustration of classroom brain chairs
Cognitive researchers are finding ways to help young students to hold on to all the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in school.
illustration of brain flexibility
Brains that learn best seem able to reconfigure themselves on the fly, a new line of research suggests.
machine learning illustration
Machine-learning programs are introducing biases that may harm job seekers, loan applicants and more.

News

moon
The moon’s magnetic field could have lasted until about a billion years ago.
soft robots
Self-healing material is helping make more resilient robots.
dodo illustration
Scientists take a first look at the inside of dodo bones.
molecules
Scientists have cooled molecules below a previously impassable limit.
Ancient humanlike species ate something that damaged its teeth.
notched sloth bones
Stone Age humans left behind clues of their presence at a remote Brazilian rock shelter.
Specialized production system lay behind the famous terra-cotta troops found in ancient Chinese emperor’s tomb.
black hole jets from M87
The beginnings of a jet from an active black hole in a distant galaxy were spotted thanks to a lucky alignment.
photo illustration of people transmitting signals
A new type of antenna could be used in tiny electronics for wearable tech, injectable medical devices and more.
female mouse embryo
Female embryos actively dismantle male reproductive tissue, a textbook-challenging study suggests.
Itch
Scientists have figured out how your brain registers the sensation of itch.
black-legged tick on the left, lone star tick on the right
There soon could be a way to differentiate between Lyme disease and a similar tick-associated illness.
hiker taking in view of mountains
Scientists may have finally pinpointed the bottoms of the continents.
two photons bounce off each other
Scientists spot evidence of photons interacting at the Large Hadron Collider.
turtle-headed sea snake
Reptile counterpart proposed for textbook example of evolution favoring darker moths amid industrial soot.
Milky Way
New census calculates black hole populations in galaxies big and small.

Notebook

nano monster truck
Chemists are scratching their heads over the wreckage of minuscule monster trucks.
yellow sea snake
A newly identified sea snake subspecies is known to live in a single gulf off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica.
aardvark
Aardvarks may get a roundabout hit from climate change — less food.
nuclear power plant in Stade, Germany
In 1967, Germany gave nuclear power a try. Today, the country is trading nukes for renewables.
Shanghai in October 2015
Dust and other tiny air pollutants can reduce solar energy output by as much as 25 percent in parts of the world.

Reviews & Previews

Anchorage quake damage
Henry Fountain’s 'The Great Quake' mixes drama and science to tell the story of the 1964 Alaska earthquake.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about rogue planets, human arrival in Australia, and exomoons.

Science Visualized

ice shelves in western Antarctic Peninsula
New 3-D maps trace the pathway that deep water takes to the surface of the Southern Ocean.