Vol. 189 No. 9 Archives

Reviews & Previews

Science Visualized

Notebook

Features

More Stories from the April 30, 2016 issue

  1. a female burying beetle
    Animals

    Female burying beetle uses chemical cue to douse love life

    While raising their young, burying beetle mothers produce a chemical compound that limits their male partner’s desire to mate.

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  2. MRI scans
    Neuroscience

    Brain holds more than one road to fear

    A study on rare patients suggests that fear can take many paths through the brain.

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  3. supernova
    Astronomy

    Companion star could have triggered supernova

    An exploding star in another galaxy might have been pushed over the edge by a stellar companion.

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  4. mouse tumor diagram
    Health & Medicine

    Cancer killers send signal of success

    Newly designed nanoparticles deliver anticancer drugs and updates on tumor death.

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  5. earthquake map
    Earth

    Quake risk in parts of central U.S. as high as in fault-filled California

    A new report from the U.S. Geological Survey shows an increased earthquake hazard from human activities such as the disposal of fracking wastewater.

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  6. quasar winds
    Astronomy

    Earth’s hurricanes have nothing on this quasar

    In a remote galaxy, a cosmic hurricane around a supermassive black hole is driving winds at nearly 20 percent of the speed of light.

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  7. snowshoe hare
    Animals

    Climate change now bigger menace than forest loss for snowshoe hares

    Shorter snow seasons push climate change ahead of direct habitat loss as menace for Wisconsin snowshoe hares.

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  8. Liang Bua Cave
    Anthropology

    Hobbits died out earlier than thought

    Tiny Indonesian hominids disappeared earlier than thought, around 50,000 years ago.

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  9. Euphrates soft-shell turtle
    Archaeology

    Ancient Assyrians buried their dead with turtles

    Why did ancient Assyrians bury their dead with turtles? The reptiles may have served as symbolic protectors of the dead.

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  10. White dwarf and Sirius
    Astronomy

    Odd white dwarf found with mostly oxygen atmosphere

    A white dwarf that has been stripped of its hydrogen and helium provides a rare peek inside the core of a dead massive star.

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  11. Mouse brain cells
    Neuroscience

    Nerve cell links severed in early stages of Alzheimer’s

    Nerve cell connections may be trimmed too much in early stages of Alzheimer’s.

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  12. Zika structure
    Life

    Zika structure mapped for first time

    The newly solved structure of Zika offers scientists clues on how to combat the virus.

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  13. Gravitational waves
    Physics

    Faint gravitational waves could soon be on LIGO’s radar

    In a few years, LIGO could detect hints of faint gravitational waves from black holes too far away to be seen directly.

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  14. marijuana
    Psychology

    Marijuana use starting in youth implicated in financial woes

    Long-term, heavy pot smoking linked to financial troubles by age 38.

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  15. Neuroscience

    Forgetting can be hard work for your brain

    It can take more work to forget something than to remember it.

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  16. People socializing
    Neuroscience

    Hippocampus makes maps of social space, too

    The hippocampus is a multitalented mapmaker.

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  17. Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica
    Climate

    Sea levels could rise twice as fast as previously predicted

    Sea level rise from Antarctica’s melting ice could accelerate faster and sooner than previously thought.

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  18. girl with floating letters
    Neuroscience

    Lip-readers ‘hear’ silent words

    Lipreading prompts activity in the brain’s listening area.

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  19. the Carina Nebula
    Astronomy

    Key sugar needed for life could have formed in space

    Sugar that forms backbone of cell machinery can form on icy grains blasted by ultraviolet light from young stars.

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  20. diamond
    Earth

    Most diamonds share a common origin story

    Most diamonds form from fluids deep inside Earth’s interior that contain carbonate compounds, new research suggests.

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  21. Bt peanut plants
    Agriculture

    Bacterium still a major source of crop pesticide

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria have provided pest-fighting toxins for over 50 years.

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  22. cave salamander
    Animals

    Cave-dwelling salamander comes pigmented and pale

    Something’s funny in the family tree of pale, slinky cave salamanders.

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  23. Allen Telescope Array
    Science & Society

    Humans have pondered aliens since medieval times

    People have been fascinated with extraterrestrials for centuries. If only aliens would get in touch.

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  24. bats in NY with white nose syndrome
    Animals

    Lethal bat disease moves west

    For the first time, the bat-killing white-nose syndrome shows up west of the Rockies.

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  25. drug-making system
    Health & Medicine

    Machine makes drugs on demand

    A new drug-making system rapidly produces a variety of medications on demand.

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  26. illustration of ancient snake
    Animals

    Ancient snake wore green

    Scientists have reconstructed the skin coloration of a fossilized snake that’s about 10 million years old.

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  27. cyborg flower beetle
    Animals

    Cyborg beetles walk the walk

    New beetle biobots come with speed and gait control.

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  28. Meat ants, Iridomyrmex purpureus
    Animals

    Ant antennae provide chemical ID

    Ants use their antennae to identify nest-mates and potential invaders. But antennae also produce the key compounds that ants use to tell friend from foe.

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