August 4, 2018 | Science News

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August 4, 2018View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses the importance of being able to illustrate science visually.
By Nancy Shute | July 7, 2018
Magazine issue: Vol. 194, No. 3 , August 4, 2018 , p. 2

Features

Maya mural

Feature

Thousands of years ago, money took different forms as a means of debt payment, archaeologists and anthropologists say.
fake news detector illustration

Feature

Fake news–finding algorithms could someday make up the front lines of online fact checking.

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Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses the importance of being able to illustrate science visually.

Features

fake news detector illustration
Fake news–finding algorithms could someday make up the front lines of online fact checking.
Maya mural
Thousands of years ago, money took different forms as a means of debt payment, archaeologists and anthropologists say.

News

spearpoints from Texas
Stone toolmakers inhabited Texas more than 16,000 years ago, before Clovis hunters arrived.
rai money display
Money has ancient and mysterious pedigrees that go way beyond coins.
virtual reality therapy program
Virtual reality may be good training ground for facing your fears in real life.
blazar illustration
The high-energy particle was born in a blazar 4 billion light-years away, scientists report.
gene-edited cancer cells
Scientists can program the stealth cells to die before creating new tumors.
stone tool at Shangchen
Newly discovered stone tools in China suggest hominids left Africa 250,000 years earlier than we thought.
exoplanet
New telescope images give the clearest view of an exoplanet embryo yet.
human-made diamond
A new design in artificial diamonds stores and releases quantum information better than others.
giant long-necked sauropod
Some early relatives of giant, long-necked sauropods may have used a different strategy to grow to colossal sizes than previously thought.
mice nerve cells
A mysterious bump on the human brain may be able to dial appetite up or down.
white rhino
Scientists have made the first rhino embryos, providing a small glimmer of hope for the nearly extinct northern white rhinoceros.
foot fossil
A foot from an ancient hominid child suggests that Lucy’s species, Australopithecus afarensis, walked early in life.
HPV
More research finds that a test for human papillomavirus infection catches precancerous cervical cells better than the standard test, a Pap.
piston illustration
Special maneuvers allow researchers to create tiny machines that are as efficient as possible.
marshmallow test
Preschoolers wait longer for extra treats than they used to. What does it mean?
a Newton's cradle
Scientists created a quantum Newton’s cradle to study thermal equilibrium.
spider in "tiptoe stance"
Spiders can sense atmospheric electric fields, which might give them cues to take to the air.

Notebook

Male bigeye houndshark
External male reproductive organs hid internal female capacity to give birth among hermaphrodite sharks in India.
Treponema pallidum
Scientists have figured out how to keep a sample of the bacteria Treponema pallidum alive and infectious for over eight months.
in vitro fertilization
In 1968, scientists figured out how to determine the sex of rabbit embryos.
map of world’s rivers and streams
A global survey of rivers and streams based on satellite data suggests that these waterways traverse about 773,000 square kilometers.

Reviews & Previews

beaver
A new book shows how important beavers have been in the past — and how they could improve the landscape of the future.

Letters to the Editor

Readers delighted in learning about Emmy Noether, and asked about autonomous taxis and how the first Americans may have arrived via coastal routes.

Science Visualized

star cluster RCW 38
A newly released image of star cluster RCW 38 shows the intricate details of wisps of gas and dust surrounding newborn stars.