Vol. 194 No. 3 Read Digital Issue Archives

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More Stories from the August 4, 2018 issue

  1. a Newton's cradle
    Quantum Physics

    A tiny version of this physics toy is revealing quantum secrets

    Scientists created a quantum Newton’s cradle to study thermal equilibrium.

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  2. map of world’s rivers and streams
    Earth

    Earth’s rivers cover 44 percent more land than we thought

    A global survey of rivers and streams based on satellite data suggests that these waterways traverse about 773,000 square kilometers.

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  3. marshmallow test
    Psychology

    Kids today are waiting longer than ever in the classic marshmallow test

    Preschoolers wait longer for extra treats than they used to. What does it mean?

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  4. piston illustration
    Quantum Physics

    Mini machines can evade friction by taking quantum shortcuts

    Special maneuvers allow researchers to create tiny machines that are as efficient as possible.

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  5. exoplanet
    Astronomy

    Astronomers snap the first baby pictures of a planet

    New telescope images give the clearest view of an exoplanet embryo yet.

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  6. HPV
    Health & Medicine

    Evidence grows that an HPV screen beats a Pap test at preventing cancer

    More research finds that a test for human papillomavirus infection catches precancerous cervical cells better than the standard test, a Pap.

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  7. foot fossil
    Anthropology

    Foot fossil pegs hominid kids as upright walkers 3.3 million years ago

    A foot from an ancient hominid child suggests that Lucy’s species, Australopithecus afarensis, walked early in life.

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  8. white rhino
    Animals

    Researchers create hybrid embryos of endangered white rhinos

    Scientists have made the first rhino embryos, providing a small glimmer of hope for the nearly extinct northern white rhinoceros.

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  9. mice nerve cells
    Neuroscience

    Nerve cells that help control hunger have been ID’d in mice

    A mysterious bump on the human brain may be able to dial appetite up or down.

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  10. spider in "tiptoe stance"
    Animals

    Soaring spiders may get cues from electric charges in the air

    Spiders can sense atmospheric electric fields, which might give them cues to take to the air.

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  11. human-made diamond
    Materials Science

    Designer diamonds could one day help build a quantum internet

    A new design in artificial diamonds stores and releases quantum information better than others.

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  12. giant long-necked sauropod
    Paleontology

    Long-necked dinosaurs grew to be giants in more ways than one

    Some early relatives of giant, long-necked sauropods may have used a different strategy to grow to colossal sizes than previously thought.

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  13. gene-edited cancer cells
    Health & Medicine

    Cancer cells engineered with CRISPR slay their own kin

    Scientists can program the stealth cells to die before creating new tumors.

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  14. spearpoints from Texas
    Archaeology

    Texas toolmakers add to the debate over who the first Americans were

    Stone toolmakers inhabited Texas more than 16,000 years ago, before Clovis hunters arrived.

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  15. blazar illustration
    Particle Physics

    A high-energy neutrino has been traced to its galactic birthplace

    The high-energy particle was born in a blazar 4 billion light-years away, scientists report.

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  16. virtual reality therapy program
    Health & Medicine

    Scared of heights? This new VR therapy could help

    Virtual reality may be good training ground for facing your fears in real life.

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  17. in vitro fertilization
    Genetics

    50 years ago, scientists took baby steps toward selecting sex

    In 1968, scientists figured out how to determine the sex of rabbit embryos.

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  18. rai money display
    Anthropology

    How an ancient stone money system works like cryptocurrency

    Money has ancient and mysterious pedigrees that go way beyond coins.

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  19. stone tool at Shangchen
    Archaeology

    Stone tools put early hominids in China 2.1 million years ago

    Newly discovered stone tools in China suggest hominids left Africa 250,000 years earlier than we thought.

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