Vol. 202 No. No. 4

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More Stories from the August 27, 2022 issue

  1. Yeast DNA transcription
    Tech

    50 years ago, genes eluded electron microscopes

    In the 1970s, scientists dreamed of seeing genes under the microscope. Fifty years later, powerful new tools are helping to make that dream come true.

    By
  2. Burger patties in various levels of doneness and buns arranged on a grill
    Math

    Here’s the quickest way to grill burgers, according to math

    The fastest way to cook a burger involves flipping the patty about three to four times, a mathematician says.

    By
  3. side-by-side images of pitcher plants growing under a moss matt and under tree roots
    Plants

    This pitcher plant species sets its deathtraps underground

    Scientists didn’t expect the carnivorous, eggplant-shaped pitchers to be sturdy enough to survive below the surface.

    By
  4. a close-up on a person's eye, with a tear streaming down their cheek
    Health & Medicine

    A new technology uses human teardrops to spot disease

    A proof-of-concept technique to analyze microscopic particles in tears could give scientists a new way to detect eye disease and other disorders.

    By
  5. children eating lunch at school
    Science & Society

    Friendships with rich people may help lift children out of poverty

    For poor children, forming connections to richer peers is linked to greater earnings later in life, researchers say.

    By
  6. an illustration of a mammal ancestor, with a rodent-like head and long furry body, exhaling hot air on a cold night
    Paleontology

    Mammal ancestors’ shrinking inner ears may reveal when warm-bloodedness arose

    An abrupt shift in inner ear shape of mammal ancestors 233 million years ago, during a time of climate swings, points to evolution of warm-bloodedness.

    By
  7. an experiment that uses strontium ions to test quantum entanglement
    Quantum Physics

    Quantum entanglement makes quantum communication even more secure

    Bell tests proved that quantum mechanics really is “spooky.” Now they’ve made quantum communication even more hacker-proof.

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  8. A small crustacean, Idotea balthica, that looks like a small clawless lobster, climbs along a stalk of red algae
    Life

    Like bees of the sea, crustaceans ‘pollinate’ seaweed

    Crustaceans shuttle around red algae’s sex cells, helping the seaweed reproduce in a manner remarkably similar to flower pollination.

    By
  9. a woman sleeps next to her baby. The photo is taken through a mosquito net.
    Health & Medicine

    A shot of immune proteins may protect against malaria for months

    A monoclonal antibody for malaria passed an early hurdle and now will be tested in children in Africa, who are most at risk of dying from the disease.

    By
  10. Illustration of two black holes merging and emitting gravitational waves. The black holes, illustrated as dark spheres, have green arrows indicating spin in opposite directions
    Physics

    Two black holes merged despite being born far apart in space

    A closer look at gravitational wave data reveals 10 overlooked mergers, including one between black holes that probably found each other late in life.

    By
  11. a child holding a glass of milk grimaces
    Anthropology

    Famine and disease may have driven ancient Europeans’ lactose tolerance

    Dealing with food shortages and infections over thousands of years, not widespread milk consumption, may be how an ability to digest dairy evolved.

    By
  12. a 14,000-year-old partial skull of an ancient hominid shown from multiple angles
    Humans

    Ancient DNA links an East Asian Homo sapiens woman to early Americans

    Genetic clues point to a Late Stone Age trek from southwestern China to North America.

    By