June 22, 2019 | Science News

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June 22, 2019View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses how scientists are devising better diagnostic tools to detect diseases.
By Nancy Shute | June 17, 2019
Magazine issue: Vol. 195, No. 11 , June 22, 2019 , p. 2

Features

tick

Feature

Lyme disease is hard to detect, but scientists are investigating new diagnostic approaches.
Langoustine claws

Feature

Chitin and chitosan from crustacean shells could put a dent in the world’s plastic waste problem.

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Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses how scientists are devising better diagnostic tools to detect diseases.

Features

Langoustine claws
Chitin and chitosan from crustacean shells could put a dent in the world’s plastic waste problem.
tick
Lyme disease is hard to detect, but scientists are investigating new diagnostic approaches.

News

space flame
In microgravity, flames are sphere-shaped. Tests of fire on the International Space Station are helping show how gases flow within flames.
red pigment in mouse fossil
For the first time, scientists have identified the chemical fingerprint of red pigment in a fossil.
gut bacteria
A new survey of interactions between microbes and medications suggests that gut bacteria play a crucial role in how the body processes drugs.
Pluto
Planetary scientists found ammonia-rich ice near cracks on Pluto, suggesting the dwarf planet had recent icy volcanoes.
black hole
A lab-made black hole that traps sound, not light, emits radiation at a certain temperature, as Stephen Hawking first predicted.
resistant bacteria
A pump protein can keep bacteria alive long enough for the microbes to develop antibiotic resistance.
Great Barrier Reef blenny
More than half of the fish flesh that predators in coral reefs eat comes from tiny, hard-to-spot species.
Riemann zeta function
A new study advances one strategy in the quest to solve the notoriously difficult problem, which is still stumping researchers after 160 years.
chocolate
Scientists have worked out the chemistry of dark chocolate’s smell and reconstructed the aroma.
Very Large Array
Astronomers have found dozens of surprisingly massive black holes far from the centers of their host dwarf galaxies.
air quality station
Since 2013, eastern China has increased its annual emissions of a banned chlorofluorocarbon by about 7,000 metric tons, a study finds.
girl writing on chalkboard
A large study of U.S. bilingual children didn’t turn up obvious benefits in abilities to ignore distractions or switch quickly between tasks.
raven
Ravens may pick up and share their compatriots’ negativity, a study on the social intelligence of these animals suggests.
metal kilogram
After years of preparation, new definitions for the basic units of mass, temperature and more have now gone into effect.
Mussaurus patagonicus
A new computer analysis shows how Mussaurus patagonicus' center of gravity changed as the dinosaur grew.
teeth
A study of fossilized teeth shifts the age of the last common ancestor between Neandertals and humans.
Kibble balance
The mini Kibble balance will measure 10 grams to an accuracy of a few ten-thousandths of a percent.
tufted puffin
A mass die-off of puffins and other seabirds in the Bering Sea is probably linked to climate change, scientists say.
saber-toothed cat skulls
Two Smilodon fossil skulls from Argentina have puncture holes likely left by the teeth of rival cats.
Tableau Physique
A seminal, 212-year-old diagram of Andean plants by German explorer Alexander von Humboldt is still groundbreaking — but outdated, researchers say.
uprooted plant
Shrubs in mountainous areas of Brazil have specialized roots that secrete chemicals to extract phosphorus from rock.

Notebook

uranium cube
New research suggests that the Nazis had enough uranium to make a working nuclear reactor.
black coucal
Frantic parenting demands after eggs hatch curtail male black coucals’ philandering excursions the most, a study finds.
bulletproof vest
In 1969, bulletproof armor used boron carbide fibers. Fifty years later, bulletproof armor is drastically lighter and made from myriad materials.

Reviews & Previews

green algae
The new book ‘Slime’ makes the case that algae deserve to be celebrated.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about the first image of a black hole and a chytrid fungus.

Science Visualized

peacock spider
By manipulating light with tiny structures, patches on peacock spiders appear superblack, helping accentuate the arachnids’ bright colors.