June 11, 2016 | Science News

Support Science Journalism

Science News is a nonprofit.

Support us by subscribing now.

June 11, 2016

Editor's Note

Editor in chief Eva Emerson discusses the value of science communication for students.
By Eva Emerson | June 1, 2016
Magazine issue: Vol. 189, No. 12 , June 11, 2016 , p. 2

Features

illustration of ancient proteins

Feature

To learn how today’s proteins evolved, scientists are reconstructing ancient molecules.
illustrations of nanoparticles

Feature

Nanoparticles that find and destroy waxy plaques in blood vessels could be the next big treatment for heart disease.

Call to Action

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Editor in chief Eva Emerson discusses the value of science communication for students.

Features

illustrations of nanoparticles
Nanoparticles that find and destroy waxy plaques in blood vessels could be the next big treatment for heart disease.
illustration of ancient proteins
To learn how today’s proteins evolved, scientists are reconstructing ancient molecules.

News

a Galápagos cormorant
Galápagos cormorants’ tiny wings may be due to altered reception in cellular antennas.
giraffes
Giraffes’ genes may reveal how their necks grew long and hearts got strong.
stone tool
Finds at an underwater site put people in Florida a surprisingly long time ago.
lava cliff
Shaken, not stirred: Tungsten isotopes reveal that mantle convection has left some remnants of ancient Earth untouched for 4.5 billion years.
Monocercomonoides
Science may finally have found a complex eukaryote cell that has lost all of its mitochondria.
person on scale
The body mass index tied to lowest risk of death has risen since the 1970s. It now falls squarely in the “overweight” category.
illustration of quasiparticle collider
A new quasiparticle collider smashes together the faux-particles that appear in solid materials.
blood vessels
A type of heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors may damage cells that line the blood vessels. The results, though controversial, hint at an explanation for PPI’s link to serious side effects, including risk of dementia and heart attack.
mountains near Tycho Crater
Seven years into its mission, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is still going strong and finding surprises on the moon.
Bacteroides fragilis and intestinal cells
Genes linked to Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory bowel disease, might make people’s immune cells miss out on helpful messages sent by friendly gut bacteria.
Primate jaw
Chinese fossils suggest primates diverged in Asia and Africa around 34 million years ago.
sick child
Children with a faulty virus-sensing gene may land in intensive care after a cold.
Mice with disturbed REM sleep show memory trouble.
zika watch
Three new studies in mice shore up the link between microcephaly and Zika virus infection.
graph of kepler exoplanets
NASA’s Kepler space telescope adds 1,284 planets to the roster of worlds known to orbit other stars in our galaxy.
First complete topographic map of Mercury reveals plains, craters and both the highest and lowest points on the planet.
male giant water bug carrying eggs on its back
Female giant water bugs prefer males already caring for eggs, an evolutionary force for maintaining parental care.

Notebook

Kate Rubins
Molecular biologist Kate Rubins led a 14-person virology lab before becoming an astronaut. She heads to the International Space Station on June 24.
Giant panda
Giant pandas hear very high frequencies. Scientists still don’t know why.
Trigonopterus chewbacca
A new weevil species,Trigonopterus chewbacca, joins the ranks of insects with a Star Wars moniker.

Reviews & Previews

Marion Hubbert
The life of geophysicist Marion King Hubbert, creator of the “peak oil” prediction, was intertwined with the politics and science of the oil industry.

Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to the April 16, 2016, issue of Science News with thoughts on climate change, prairie dogs and more.

Science Visualized

green hairstreak butterfly
Scientists re-created a nanostructure found on butterflies that can separate out circularly polarized light, a characteristic that may be useful for telecommunications.