• News

    Nanotubes spring eternal

    Researchers have discovered that forests of carbon nanotubes squish and expand like foams, but with extraordinary resilience.
  • News

    A puny way to make planets

    Brown dwarfs are failures in the star-making business, but new observations reveal that they may still succeed in growing planets.
  • News

    Lab tests hint at where xenon hides out

    Results of recent experiments in which scientists squeezed a mixture of xenon and powdered quartz at high temperatures and pressures may explain why the gas is found at relatively low concentrations in the atmosphere.
  • News

    Molecule marks leukemia cells

    Researchers can now single out malignant cells in the bone marrow of patients with acute myeloid leukemia by using an antibody that latches on to a newfound cell protein.
  • News

    Old drug, new trick

    The drug rapamycin, now used in transplants, may make chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia more effective.
  • News

    Protein predicts sickle-cell danger

    A biological marker of heart trouble can be used to identify sickle-cell anemia patients who are at greatest risk of developing a serious, disease-related complication.
  • News

    Ozone hole might not recover until the year 2065

    The ozone-free zone that develops high in the atmosphere over Antarctica each summer as the result of the presence of chlorine- and bromine-containing chemicals may not heal until 15 years later than previously projected.