August 22, 2015 | Science News

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August 22, 2015

Editor's Note

The details emerging from the latest work on glial cells are sure to yield more insights as scientists continue their struggle to understand the mind.
By Eva Emerson | August 12, 2015
Magazine issue: Vol. 188, No. 4 , August 22, 2015 , p. 2

Features

Automated chemistry apparatus

Feature

Automated molecular synthesis may win over chemists who are not convinced that more technology in drug design is better.
Neurons and glia

Feature

Brain cells called glia may be center stage when it comes to learning and memory, recent research suggests.

Call to Action

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Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

The details emerging from the latest work on glial cells are sure to yield more insights as scientists continue their struggle to understand the mind.

Features

Neurons and glia
Brain cells called glia may be center stage when it comes to learning and memory, recent research suggests.
Automated chemistry apparatus
Automated molecular synthesis may win over chemists who are not convinced that more technology in drug design is better.

News

zebrafish
Zebrafish study shows organisms can work around DNA mutations.
Folded layers of carbon nanotubes
Folded layers of carbon nanotubes allow an elastic fiber to conduct electrical current when stretched.
stink bug eggs
P. maculiventris moms control the color of their eggs, seemingly pairing darker eggs with darker surfaces.
Philae
Philae’s bouncy journey across comet 67P allowed it to check out two very different sites before taking a detailed look at both the inside and outside of the comet.
Microscopic beads and oil droplets become lasers when implanted into cells.
false-color image of pluto
New Horizons’ latest data reveal more hints about Pluto’s shrinking atmosphere and possible underground ocean.
Kepler 452b
A new analysis of data from NASA’s Kepler mission has uncovered a planet orbiting a sunlike star that could be Earth’s “cousin.”
MERS virus particles
Scientists have isolated a human immune protein that fights the MERS virus in mice.
Scientists have discovered the fossilized remains of the first four-legged snake. The fossil bridges the gap between snakes and lizards.
Abrupt warming and excessive hunting by ancient humans were responsible for the disappearance of many large mammals, including woolly mammoths, during Earth’s last glacial period.
amoebas (yellow); brain (blood vessel and blood cells shown in blue and orange)
Immune response to brain-eating amoeba may be the real killer.
 illegal ivory
Carbon released from burning fossil fuels will jeopardize the effectiveness of many carbon dating applications, new research predicts.
mosquito
Mosquitoes use their senses in sophisticated combinations and sequences to find you.
roots of a weed called Arabidopsis thaliana
Plants use salicylic acid to attract some bacteria to roots and repel others.
Weyl fermions, which resemble massless electrons, have been spotted inside tantalum arsenide. Their discovery comes 86 years after they were proposed.
Therapeutic cells (pink)
Scientists have new insight as to how a class of environment-sensing bone marrow cells can help safely relieve pain.
 chemical DHED
Scientists have developed a chemical that transforms into the hormone estrogen in the brain, but not the body, of rats.
Native Americans' origins
Genetic link between Australia and the Amazon fuels two interpretations of Native American origins.

Notebook

Boa Snake
Boa constrictors don’t suffocate prey; they block blood flow, says a new study that shatters a common myth about the snakes.
Scientist’s claims of transferred memories were more fiction than fact.

Reviews & Previews

Hindenburg
Drawing on the Hindenburg disaster, a science writer develops criteria for recognizing risky technology.
Jon Palfreman’s Brain Storms explores Parkinson’s disease in the past, present and future.
Astronaut Exhibit
At Kennedy Space Center, pieces of wreckage from the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia are on public display for the first time.

Letters to the Editor

Readers discuss why Pluto's data will take so long to get to Earth, the role the cerebellum plays in creative thinking and more.

Science Visualized

NASA’s Kepler spacecraft has discovered a “cousin” of Earth 1,400 light-years away. But even though the new planet bears many similarities to Earth, experts say much about it remains a mystery.