July 11, 2015 | Science News

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July 11, 2015

Editor's Note

Research on vaping fills a crucial need in science’s service to society: providing the best information possible in a timely manner, so people can make wise choices.
By Eva Emerson | July 1, 2015
Magazine issue: Vol. 188 No. 1 , July 11, 2015 , p. 2

Features

young man vaping

Feature

E-cigarettes have surpassed cigarettes as the most commonly used tobacco product among teenagers. Medical researchers are sounding the alarm.
tiny semiconductor particles

Feature

Quantum dots, semiconductor particles that can emit a rainbow of colors, have been put to work observing living cells, with possible benefits for medical diagnosis.

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SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Research on vaping fills a crucial need in science’s service to society: providing the best information possible in a timely manner, so people can make wise choices.

Features

tiny semiconductor particles
Quantum dots, semiconductor particles that can emit a rainbow of colors, have been put to work observing living cells, with possible benefits for medical diagnosis.
young man vaping
E-cigarettes have surpassed cigarettes as the most commonly used tobacco product among teenagers. Medical researchers are sounding the alarm.

News

Saturn has an invisible belt that's nearly 270 times as wide as the giant planet, researchers report.
grand canyon
The Grand Canyon is much younger than previous research had suggested, a new study says.
computational image, a ligand protein binds to precise spots
The immune system’s T cells, often evaded by tumors, might now resume the attack.
colonies of velvet spiders
Incorrect ideas prove more dangerous in bold velvet spiders than in shyer ones.
brains
Brain regions involved in recognizing familiar songs are relatively unscathed in Alzheimer’s disease.
Organisms with and without a genetic mutation for mortality
Aging may have developed in many species as a genetic mechanism to conserve future resources. If the controversial proposal is true, then scientists may be able to greatly extend life span by deactivating the machinery for aging embedded in our DNA.
solar corona
A swaying forest of mangrovelike magnetic fields on the sun could be the answer to why the solar atmosphere is millions of degrees hotter than the surface.
prions and disease
If cannibalism hadn’t stopped, a protective protein may have ended kuru anyway.
possible footprints from a young girl
African trackers help researchers interpret ancient human footprints in French caves.
induced earthquake
An up-close look at artificially triggered quakes suggests that tremors start slow and smooth.
skull
A new study indicates long journeys and unexpected genetic links in Bronze Age Eurasian cultures.
When a female mouse is in an infertile stage of her reproductive cycle, her nose cells don’t alert her brain to the presence of a potential mate.
embryo
Human embryos come with some heavy-duty erasers. Chemical tags on DNA get mostly wiped out in the womb.
On the eve of the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft, Pluto’s tiny moons hint at a common origin.
mantis shrimps sparring
In ritualized combat between deadly mantis shrimp, blows count but don’t kill.
Antibiotics can successfully treat the majority of cases of a type of appendicitis, researchers find.
chimps laughing
Chimps make laughing faces that speak to evolution of human ha-ha’s.
rogue wave
Scientists may be able to forecast the arrival of anomalously large ocean swells, suggest scientists who analyzed the moments before rogue water waves and freak light flashes.

Notebook

A lifelong amateur radio enthusiast, Joseph Taylor sends signals via the moon.
campfire
A standard method for building fires, making the height about equal to the width, is the most efficient structure for stoking the hottest flames, calculations show.
Brachycephalus verrucosus frog
Scientists find seven new species of frogs in southern Brazil, and more could be waiting, they say.
inset of Mars from Mariner, Curiosity selfie
On July 14, 1965, Mariner 4 became the first spacecraft to fly by Mars. The probe also sent back the first pictures of another planet taken from space.
flaws in research
Problems with preclinical research often stem from study design and experiments’ materials.

Reviews & Previews

A free new app compiles millions of records of species worldwide and allows users to add sightings.
In ‘Thank You, Madagascar,’ primatologist Alison Jolly, who spent decades studying lemurs, provides an insider’s account of the struggles that conservationists face.
A science book inspired by fictional scientists helps readers understand everything from particle physics to potato electricity.
science vs religion
Jerry Coyne’s ‘Faith vs. Fact’ argues that science is the best – perhaps only – way of learning about the world.

Letters to the Editor

Readers sort out a definition for processed food, discuss the benefits of tinkering with human DNA and more.

Science Visualized

sci viz loops
In visible light, sunspots look like dark blotches that often expel flares of searing plasma. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory offers a different view.