March 21, 2015 | Science News

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March 21, 2015

Editor's Note

A risky venture to study cosmic ray particles offers no guarantee of success, but it may help answer two of the biggest questions in physics.
By Eva Emerson | March 11, 2015
Magazine issue: Vol. 187, No. 6 , March 21, 2015 , p. 2

Features

fruit fly

Feature

Using optogenetics and other techniques, scientists are tracing connections to and from the brain’s aggression command center.
Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

Feature

Particle physicist Sam Ting is applying a meticulous approach to analyzing positrons in space, testing whether they can reveal clues about dark matter.

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SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

A risky venture to study cosmic ray particles offers no guarantee of success, but it may help answer two of the biggest questions in physics.

Features

Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer
Particle physicist Sam Ting is applying a meticulous approach to analyzing positrons in space, testing whether they can reveal clues about dark matter.
fruit fly
Using optogenetics and other techniques, scientists are tracing connections to and from the brain’s aggression command center.

News

Fossilized teeth
Fossilized teeth from the newly identified Epirigenys lokonensis, an ancestor of the hippopotamus, are filling in some of the mammoth mammal’s history.
Four star system
Four young stars, still in their cocoons, show that binary and other multiple star systems form together.
Kepler 11
Solar systems discovered by Kepler with just one or two worlds may be remnants of planet families that were once far more crowded.
Big Brain
Genetic tweaks may make human brains big.
In a teleportation first, physicists transfer two quantum properties from one photon to another.
peanut butter
In many infants at risk of developing a peanut allergy, early and steady exposure to peanut butter prevents it, a new study finds.
Droplets
Dense blends of metals and sulfur get a ride to the surface on water vapor bubbles.
Child
Disruptive children with DNA twist show biggest turnaround with 10-year intervention.
Luna moths
Luna moths can use their tails to reflect the echolocation pings of bats, tricking the predators into striking the tails instead of less expendable body parts.
New results from the Planck satellite largely support cosmologists’ theories, but leave the door open for new discoveries.
Male bluebird feeds female
Extra hormones delivered to eggs holding sons in tough times end up driving one bluebird species to chase off another
Enceladus
The pH of a subsurface sea on a moon of Saturn resembles an ice-covered lake in Antarctica where microbial mats thrive.
Geoid visualization
On North America’s East Coast, sea levels tilt slightly downward to the north, new research finds.
dog looking at a screen in a lab
A new test using pictures of halves of human faces challenges dogs’ abilities to read people’s emotions.
PET brain scans
PET scans reveal that the breakdown of brain networks differs in Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.
Transplaneted cells
Scientists healed damage caused to rats’ brains from radiation by injecting cells that replenish the insulation on neurons.
Neuron connections
New experiences can rewire old brains — but the timing has to be just right.
Adolescents may be more apt to experience an extreme allergic reaction than younger children, researchers report.
wheat map
European hunter-gatherers may have traded for agricultural products 8,000 years ago.
diagram of body parts
A map of chemical modifications of DNA and its associated proteins shows how the genome changes during development and disease.
Emperor penguin and chick
Penguins lack taste genes for bitter, sweet and umami.

Notebook

Scholz star
Astronomers discover a binary system that made the closest known flyby of the sun.
glass of water on an empty plate
A newly discovered hormone suppresses insulin production and secretion in fruit flies and maybe in humans.
A Northern quoll
Northern quolls run like crazy to find mates.
In 1965, two scientists spotted molecular signatures of primate divergence. The tool became widespread for studying evolution – and one researcher’s career ended in crime.
Lepilemur hubbardorum
As the climate warms, Madagascar’s little primates will lose habitat, threatening some with extinction.

Reviews & Previews

‘Feral Cities’ explores the wildlife living amongst us, sometimes noticed and sometimes not.
Even on a small farm, life can be brutal for animals, historian and animal rights advocate says in new book.

Letters to the Editor

Readers discuss the potential impacts of human-made fliers and muse about the advantages a poker-playing computer program has over human opponents.

Science Visualized

Titan oceans
A phenomenon similar to Earth’s hydrological cycle on Saturn’s largest moon Titan may create different lake compositions, similar to the salinity difference between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean.