May 30, 2015 | Science News

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May 30, 2015

Editor's Note

Gene therapy becomes more sophisticated, and the debate over the ethics of DNA tinkering grows.
By Eva Emerson | May 20, 2015
Magazine issue: Vol. 187, No. 11 , May 30, 2015 , p. 2

Features

doughnuts

Feature

The typical American diet sends our good and bad gut microbes out of balance and can lead to inflammation and a host of problems.
optogenetics

Feature

The cutting-edge technology called optogenetics may offer a workaround to partially restore vision even after the retina’s light-sensing rods and cones die.

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Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Gene therapy becomes more sophisticated, and the debate over the ethics of DNA tinkering grows.

Features

optogenetics
The cutting-edge technology called optogenetics may offer a workaround to partially restore vision even after the retina’s light-sensing rods and cones die.
doughnuts
The typical American diet sends our good and bad gut microbes out of balance and can lead to inflammation and a host of problems.

News

Chilesaurus
Fossils of a bizarre-looking dinosaur found in Chile are challenging ideas about how dinosaurs adapted to their environments.
thunder image
Scientists precisely capture thunder sound waves radiating from artificially triggered lightning.
A modified version of a landmark quantum physics experiment has shown that a single parcel of light can be a particle and a wave simultaneously.
ocean sediment cores
The current rate of carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere is unprecedented over at least the last 66 million years, new research shows.
Measels shot
Measles infection leaves kids vulnerable to other infectious diseases for much longer than scientists suspected.
leg bone
Human bones show signs of ritual cannibalism in England 14,700 years ago.
gram staining bacteria
New research upends what scientists know about a classic lab technique, called gram staining, used for more than a century to characterized and classify bacteria.
germline editing
Human gene editing experiments raise scientific and societal questions.
effects of radiation on the brain
Charged particles like the ones astronauts might encounter wallop the brain, mouse study suggests.
Yi qi
A new dino called Yi qi may have taken to the skies with wings akin to those of pterosaurs and flying squirrels.
Lightning illuminates the sky during a storm in Weld County, Colo.
Radio waves emitted by particles zipping through thunderstorms allow physicists to probe thunderclouds and, perhaps eventually, learn what triggers lightning strikes.
the sun in UV
Millions of mini-explosions every second on the sun could solve the riddle of why the sun’s atmosphere is so much warmer than its surface.
Bullying
U.S., British data raise bullying’s profile as a long-term mental health hazard for kids.
seafloor map
New phylum of sea-bottom archaea microbes could be closest living relatives yet found to the eukaryote domain of complex life that includes people.
Changes in the way that DNA is tightly packed in cells leads to mayhem that promotes the aging process.

Notebook

Flagstaff, Echidna, Spock. Naming conventions for the landscapes of Pluto and its moons are proposed ahead of the arrival of the New Horizons probe.
Vampire squid of hell
The vampire squid again defies its sensationalist name with a life in the slow lane.
Ovaries
A tumor-produced protein that interferes with insulin causes wasting in fruit flies with cancer.
REM Cat
Early research asked whether cats dream; researchers still don’t know definitively.
Amazon rainforest
Roughly 1 percent of tree species in the Amazon rainforest account for half of the jungle’s carbon storage.

Reviews & Previews

card game Ion
A new card game lets players brush up on chemistry by making compounds out of ions. Form some bonds and have fun in the process.
abandoned factory in Chernobyl
‘Dispatches from Dystopia’ chronicles adventures in modernist wastelands to recount tales of the invisible and the overlooked, the exiled and the dispossessed.
hawthorn hedge row
Spiky hawthorn trees have found many uses despite their unforgiving nature, Bill Vaughn writes in ‘Hawthorn.’

Letters to the Editor

Readers discuss the posture of an ancient reptile and why washing machines and nanoparticles don't mix.

Science Visualized

computer simulation of flying male beetle
Male stag beetles need enormous mandibles to fend off other males and find a mate, but computer simulations show that the giant jaws make running and flying very difficult.